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Vegetable garden on the terrace: position and choice of vegetables


Vegetable garden on the terrace: position and choice of vegetables


Exposure is one of the most important criteria for positioning your vegetables on the terrace, since all vegetables, without exclusion, need an abundant brightness for their development. From this point of view the positions to the south seem particularly indicated, but in summer they can be harmful for your plants. If possible, choose east, south-east and south-west exposures, alternatively we will have to provide ourselves with shading to protect our vegetables from the heat. By shading we mean special nets that filter the rays of the sun or of shrubs on the terrace that create shaded areas for vegetables. A further method could be to create greenhouses on the terrace. For the sake of completeness, we point out that depending on the chosen plants we may not need shaded shelters: carrots, radishes, potatoes and all the species that hold the edible underground part in general can be placed in any position. Also take care that your vegetables are not excessively exposed to the wind which could bend stems and uproot plants, as well as letting the water from the leaves breathe too quickly causing serious damage. The space will then be exploited to the fullest, planting more vegetables in a single box instead of in single pots; moreover the boxes can also be placed on a shelving unit, designed so that the vegetables do not take light off one another. You can also opt for some hanging pots or for the cultivation of climbing vegetables, which can also take advantage of the vertical dimension of the terrace. Since the space is reduced cultivate plants of good productivity, with a short growing cycle that allows the rotation: from this point of view they are very suitable for example salads and radishes. On windowsills they also adapt well to beans, green beans and aromatic herbs, while they need more volume for example tomatoes, courgettes and aubergines. Finally, be careful to cultivate vegetables in the same pot that are not compatible with each other in terms of size and harvesting times, for example we will not be able to insert radicchio and zucchini in the same jar, because the foliage of the zucchini plant would overshadow the radicchio plant leading it to decay. . Or they will alternate the improving crops that supply Nitrogen in the substrate before the culture of the other varieties.